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Fiction

‘The Children Act’, by Ian McEwan

Religion comes under the hammer in Ian McEwan’s latest

Wittgenstein Jr by Lars Iyer logical brooding meets the broad humour of student life

Strange things happen when academic satire and the philosophical novel collideWittgenstein Jr is an odd novel, but it is definitely meant to be odd. A lecturer in philosophy, Lars Iyer's comic invention and leaness in his previous works, Spurious, Dog

Unrivalled eye for life-changing minutiae

Ian McEwan’s latest novel is swift, compelling and a pleasure from start to finish.

The Children Act, Little Revolution, Watermark, Secrets, Bernd and Hilla Becher

Ian McEwan's new novel The Children Act deals with a young man who is suffering from leukaemia and the conflict between his parent's wishes and the authority of the State in the form of a high court judge.

The Children Act, Little Revolution, Watermark, Secrets, Bernd and Hilla Becher

Ian McEwan's new novel The Children Act deals with a young man who is suffering from leukaemia and the conflict between his parent's wishes and the authority of the State in the form of a high court judge.

The Paying Guests review: Sarah Waters' 'raunchy and romantic' novel is 'unputdownable'

ATHOUGH slow-starting, the Booker-nominated writer's new novel weaves together class clashes, marital betrayal and illicit lesbian love in post-First World War south London.

David Mitchell's The Bone Clocks is an 'epic' Cloud Atlas follow-up

THE Cloud Atlas author weaves 1980s Gravesend, sci-fi future and life as a teenage girl in an ambitious epic with an immensely believable heroine.

The Children Act review: Ian McEwan's lively, complex moral dilemma

THE Atonement author explores the dilemmas around a teen's right to refuse medical treatment and a spouse in a sexless marriage's right to have an affair.

Unlearning with Hannah Arendt by Marie Luise Knott, book review: One woman's quest to understand Nazi horrors

Reading about a white Englishwoman who apparently used to play in a punk band, converted to Islam, moved to Iraq and now dreams of sticking "Christian heads on spikes", Hannah Arendt's well-known phrase about "the banality of evil" comes to mind.