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Installation & Multimedia

Stranger Than Fiction At Science Museum

Mermaids, a rodent with a snake for a tail and a winged deer. These sound like creatures that could only exist in the imagination, or are they? Joan Fontcuberta has created a witty and subversive exhibition that will make you question whether his creation

Joan Fontcuberta: Stranger than Fiction, Science Museum, London

The Catalan artist and curator has created a brilliant show of faked artefacts and photographs, executed with maximum plausibility

After Dark - Tate Britain

Ever wanted to explore a museum alone, at night? After Dark is a series of live events taking place over five nights at Tate Britain. Via an online portal, the public will be able to control robots and roam the galleries in search of 500 years of Briti

Gilbert & George: Scapegoating Pictures for London

Never have kisses seemed more self-consciously sardonic than in Gilbert & George’s ‘Scapegoating Pictures for London’.

Giulio Paolini: To Be Or Not To Be

Right at the start of this excellent retrospective is a lifesize image of Giulio Paolini, arms folded, wearing some cool shades (pictured).

Gilbert & George: Scapegoating Pictures for London, White Cube - exhibition review

Gilbert and George's latest images at the White Cube explore themes of paranoia, religion and atheism.

Gilbert And George Create A Scary Picture Of London

Gilbert & George are an artistic duo whose large scale works are about fear, and their signature is to always include themselves in their own artworks.

Gilbert & George exhibition: Offensive, progressive, or just anarchic?

Gilbert & George have always delighted in causing offence. In their new exhibition, the immaculately tailored pair attack religious fundamentalism, drug abuse and youth culture and have produced their most outrageous – and brilliant – works yet, says

Glasgow 2014: Scots artists take on Commonwealth

WITH Glasgow 2014’s opening just days away, a year of art celebrating and questioning Scotland and its Commonwealth past reaches a crescendo.

Halfway through 512 hours of Marina Abramovi: no one to hear you scream

Our critic revisits Abramović's residency at the Serpentine and finds its stifling silence and exam-style tasks evoke more production-line misery than mindfulness.