Judith Mackrell

Israel Galván – review

As a dancer, Israel Galván is touched by the kind of genius that puts him into a category of his own. The Seville-born flamenco artist throws out such a variety of rhythm, shape and imagery with his body that it's hard to believe he's the only dancer on

The Mikhailovsky Ballet and a tale of two Giselles

The Mikhailovsky Ballet opens its London season this week with the most perfect of all romantic ballets, Giselle.

Ballet Black - review

Ballet Black may struggle against an inexplicable lack of state funding, yet it continues to make a heroic investment in new choreography. This season its adventurous policies pay dividends with Javier de Frutos's new piece, The One Played Twice.

Why English National Ballet's rebranding was a necessary step

When Tamara Rojo took over English National Ballet last summer, she vowed to make it Britain's "best loved and most creative company". Last month she put an image to that statement, commissioning a rebrand that's a world away from the old tutu-and-tights

Royal Ballet Mixed Programme - review

Alexei Ratmansky is the choreographer of the moment, the man with a golden touch, and the buzz of expectation surrounding his first creation for the Royal has been distractingly high. In fact, 24 Preludes isn't the masterpiece some were hoping for, though

Birmingham Royal Ballet: Aladdin - review

Very few companies can afford not to have a few family-friendly, fairytale ballets in their repertory and David Bintley has been candid in admitting that his Aladdin offers exactly "what it says on the tin". With its simple storytelling, bright, extrovert

Flow - review

The Print Room, London Hubert Essakow 's multimedia dance work puts a new spin on immersive performance. Waterproof capes are handed out as we enter the tiny Print Room theatre, and by the last 10 minutes, everyone is sheltering gratefully under them

The Old King - review

Linbury Studio, London Writers have a thousand ways of portraying end-of-the-world angst: Shakespeare's Lear ranting into the storm; Beckett's Winnie, chatting blithely into the void. For dancers, though, the options are more limited - especially when it