Email Artswrap on Twitter Artswrap on Facebook

Martin Kettle

Prom 9: LSO/Gergiev review Barry Douglas compels in Brahms

Royal Albert Hall, LondonJanáek's Glagolitic Mass lacked subtlety, but Douglas's account of Brahms's First Piano Concerto was compellingAmid the compulsive hyping that affects classical music, Barry Douglas remains defiantly and admirably grounded. But D

Prom 6: Der Rosenkavalier review scaled back but still a treat

In May, reviews of Glyndebourne's new production of Der Rosenkavalier triggered a media storm about sexism.

Don Giovanni review revival does its best, despite clunky staging

Energised conducting from Andrés Orozco-Estrada and a line-up of strong principal singers rescue this production from its ponderous, dramatically cramping set.

COE/Haitink review richly embodied conductor's enduring mastery

Bernard Haitink brought the audience to their feet with a hugely moving delivery of Beethoven's Sixth Symphony.

La Fanciulla del West review – Puccini's gold rush enters the atomic age

Its relocation to an atomic-testing ground in Nevada may not convince, but this production hots up with impressive results.

Così Fan Tutte review – fun but superficial spin on Mozart

The ENO's new version of Mozart's opera is visually full-on, but loses sight of some of its disturbing emotional underpinning.

Ibragimova/Tiberghien - review

Wigmore Hall, London Schubert's output for violin and piano was small, considering the formidable productivity of his chamber writing in so many other forms. Though no less a pairing than Fritz Kreisler and Sergei Rachmaninov once made a celebrated r

Hagen Quartet - review

Wigmore Hall, London The Hagen Quartet 's Beethoven cycle at the Wigmore Hall stretches until late May. Their distribution of the quartets between six concerts avoids the traditional patterns, and nowhere was this thoughtful programming more striking

Britten Sinfonia/Hewitt - review

Barbican, London When keyboard lions of the past such as Arthur Rubinstein and Claudio Arrau were still playing, a weighty evening containing two, or sometimes even three, Beethoven piano concertos was not an uncommon piece of concert programming. Bu