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Paul Taylor

Wonderland, Hampstead Theatre, review: 'Moving and timely'

This powerful play about the 1984-85 miners' strike and the profound cultural change that Thatcher's defeat of the NUM betokened comes with the endorsement of David Hare.

Great Britain, National Theatre, review: Billie Piper 'excellent' as tabloid editor

Clearly nobody from a rival outfit has been hacking the phones of dramatist Richard Bean and the National Theatre’s artistic director Nicholas Hytner or they wouldn’t have been able to spring this bracing surprise on us.

Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf, Theatre Royal Bath, theatre review

Marriage is a booze-fuelled Strindbergian blood sport in Edward Albee's 1962 classic and Tim Piggott-Smith and Clare Higgins land viciously funny linguistic blows on each other with a shocking, deadly aplomb in Adrian Noble's fine revival of the play in B

Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf, Theatre Royal Bath, theatre review

Marriage is a booze-fuelled Strindbergian blood sport in Edward Albee's 1962 classic and Tim Piggott-Smith and Clare Higgins land viciously funny linguistic blows on each other with a shocking, deadly aplomb in Adrian Noble's fine revival of the play in B

The Valley of Astonishment, Young Vic, theatre review: 'Exquisitely judged'

Twenty years ago, having taken myth as far as it can theatrically reach in the mighty nine-hour Mahabharata (all human and cosmic life was there), the great director Peter Brook made his first exploratory foray inward into the labyrinth of the brain with

Adler & Gibb, Royal Court, review: Memorable and rewarding

Tim Crouch's work has long been animated by his frustrated sense that theatre lags behind visual art in its over-reliance on the realistic and the figurative and in its limited range of demands on an audience.

Khandan, Royal Court, review: 'Shrewdly observed tragicomedy'

A decade ago, Gurpreet Kaur Bhatti's play Behzti, which depicts rape in a Sikh temple, sparked such violent protests that it was withdrawn on the grounds of public safety.

Mr Burns, Almeida Theatre, review: 'Lacks speed and cheek of The Simpsons'

Anne Washburn's serio-comic off-Broadway smash is one of those works that prove to be far more stimulating as a concept than in the actual execution.

Fathers and Sons, Donmar Warehouse, review: Seth Numrich returns to London stage

Having excelled as a Tennessee Williams flaky golden-boy-turned gigolo in Sweet Bird of Youth last year, American actor Seth Numrich returns to the London stage now as the brilliant student nihilist, Bazarov, the portent of revolutionary change in Turgene

The Roof, Doon Street Car Park, London - theatre review

Twenty years ago, the great Japanese director Yukio Ninagawa used the idea of the video game as a metaphor for the questings of Ibsen's Peer Gynt, played by Michael Sheen.